Tom Dent Congo Square Symposium

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Exploring the ways cities navigate the conflicts between cultural expression and code enforcement

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Maurice Cox

Tom Dent Congo Square Symposium

"CULTURE 
& REGULATION"

Thursday, April 4, 2013
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Old U.S. Mint
400 Esplanade Ave., Third Floor
Free Admission

In urban areas, conflict between “cultural expression” and “quality of life” is nearly inevitable. When people live in close proximity to one another, what is music to some will be noise to others. Throughout modern history, cities have had to find ways to negotiate these conflicts and manage them to create successful outcomes that satisfy most citizens.

In this forum, we will hear how a diverse range of American cities have addressed these issues, providing insights that may inform similar efforts in the New Orleans context. Through this event, we hope to shed light on ways New Orleans can address similar issues while doing more to promote our world-famous music and culture.
 
Speakers:

Kristin Palmer, New Orleans City Council Member District C

Maurice Cox, former mayor of Charlottesville, VA, current director of Tulane City Center and associate dean for community engagement at the Tulane University School of Architecture

Richard Campanella, Tulane University School of Architecture
“Making Peace with Conflict: Bourbon Street, 1940s-2000s.”
The geographer will explain neighborhood discord in the mid-century French Quarter and how parties found a way to manage points of contention, if not resolve them.

Joseph S. Lewis, Dean of the Claire Trevor School of the Arts, University of California at Irvine
"The Real Estate Show: Arts Communities vs Developers"

Jim Butler, Manager, Creative Industries Development, City of Austin
"Creating 'The Live Music Capital of the World'"
Austin, TX, has been one of the nation's most successful cities in promoting tourism by establishing its brand as a cultural destination. We hear how Austin has navigated the challenges of making sure its neighborhoods are friendly to artists, the businesses that support them and the residents who live nearby.

David Dixon, principal in charge, Goody Clancy City Planning and Urban Design
"Planning for Neighborhoods of Culture: The Master Planning Process, Culture and Quality of Life"

Dave Woolworth, Oxford Acoustics
Summarizing the New Orleans Soundscape and Sound Ordinance Study
A brief summary of the findings of an 18 month observation and analysis of the New Orleans soundscape and sound ordinance. Thoughts and approaches toward establishing people's coexistence in the mixed use environment in tandem with historical and cultural expectations.

 

About the Presenters:

Maurice Cox is a nationally respected community designer and leader of the public interest design movement - and recently came to New Orleans as director of the Tulane City Center and associate dean for community engagement at the Tulane University School of Architecture in New Orleans. In his new roles, Cox will oversee a wide range of initiatives with Tulane architecture faculty and students throughout the New Orleans community.  He is an urban designer, architectural educator at the University of Virginia, School of Architecture and former mayor of Charlottesville, Virginia. He most recently served as Director of Design for the National Endowment for the Arts where he presided over the largest expansion of direct grants to the design fields, oversaw the Governors’ Institute on Community Design, the Your Town Rural Institute, and the Mayors’ Institute on City Design. To strengthen urban design implementation by MICD alumni mayors Cox developed the MICD Technical Assistance Workshops and assisted in the creation of the NEA’s MICD’s 25th Anniversary Initiative celebrating the program’s 25-year history of transforming communities through design.

Joseph S. Lewis is a nationally known artist, arts administrator, educator, and author, is dean of The Claire Trevor School of the Arts, University of California, Irvine. He has also served as dean of the School of Art and Design at Alfred University, New York, and on the faculty of California Institute of the Arts (Calarts) while also administering a public art program for the City of Los Angeles. Lewis is the recipient numerous awards including several National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Ford Foundation Fellowship and a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship. Most recently he was named Deutsche Bank Fellow in Photography by the New York Foundation for the Arts. Lewis has written for Art in America, Artforum, and was a contributing editor for Artspace and a correspondent for Contemporanea.. His essays regarding the confluence of art, technology, and society have been published in anthologies and peer reviewed journals.

Richard Campanella, a geographer with the Tulane School of Architecture, is the author of numerous articles and six critically acclaimed books on the historical geography of New Orleans, including Bienville’s Dilemma, Delta Urbanism, Geographies of New Orleans, and Lincoln in New Orleans. The only two-time winner of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities "Book of the Year" Award, Campanella has also received the Williams Prize for Louisiana History, Tulane University’s Monroe Fellowship, and the Tulane-Newcomb Excellence in Teaching award.

Kristin Gisleson Palmer was elected District "C" Councilmember in February 2010. She is chair of the City Council's Transportation, Disaster & Recovery, and Sanitation & Environmental Committees. She is co-chair of the Council's Housing and Human Needs Committee. She is the founder and former President of the nonprofit organization Confetti Kids, Inc., and the former Executive Director of Rebuilding Together New Orleans. Gisleson Palmer has been honored with numerous awards and selected to participate in prestigious national fellowship programs. Most recently Councilmember Gisleson Palmer was chosen as a founding Advisory Board member of the Smart Growth America Local Leaders Council, a newly formed national network of municipal leaders across the country committed to Smart Growth principles. She was selected as an Aspen Institute Rodel Fellow, is an alumnus of the New Orleans Regional Leadership Institute (NORLI), was selected to be part of the national network of NewDEAL Leaders in 2011, received the National Trust for Historic Preservation Award in 2009 and was recognized with a CityBusiness Women of the Year Award in 2007.

Jim Butler is the Manager of Creative Industries Development for the City of Austin. He works with various technology, entertainment, and arts sectors to improve the economy of Austin.

David Dixon is the principal-in-charge for Goody Clancy’s Planning and Urban Design practice. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him its 2007 Thomas Jefferson Award for “a lifetime of … significant achievement in [creating]… livable neighborhoods, vibrant civic spaces, and vital downtowns ...” David’s work has won national awards from the American Planning Association (APA), AIA, American Society of Landscape Architects, Congress for the New Urbanism, International Downtown Association, and Society for College and University Planning. As 2003 President of the Boston Society of Architects, he chaired the “First National Conference on Density: Myth and Reality.” David is a co-author of Urban Design for an Urban Century (Wiley 2009), which the Boston Globe's architectural critical, Robert Campbell FAIA, described as "The wisest, clearest introduction I know to the art and science of designing cities" and writes on emerging urban issues for periodicals and books published by the AIA, APA, MIT Press, Urban Land Institute, and similar organizations. As chair of the AIA’s Regional and Urban Design Committee, David helped shape the AIA’s response to Hurricane Katrina and went on to prepare the post-Katrina Master Plan for New Orleans, where he continues to work. Additional current and recent work includes a new high density, mixed-use, walkable downtown for suburban Dublin (Ohio); breaking down the barriers between campus and community for urban universities including Drexel, Ohio State, and the Aga Khan Liberal Arts University in Karachi; growth strategies for innovation districts including Kendall Square (adjacent to MIT), East Franklinton near downtown Columbus (Ohio), and “U” districts adjacent to the University of Washington (Seattle); downtown plans for Wichita, Asheville (NC), and New Orleans; and “Choice Neighborhood” revitalization plans for Baltimore, Columbus, and San Antonio. David earned a Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan University, Master of Architecture from University of Pennsylvania, and Master of Urban Design from Harvard University.

David Woolworth has been working in acoustics research and consulting since 1987, and as a performing musician in many genres since 1977. His approach to his work utilizes a combination of skill sets derived from his experience as an artist, musician, engineer and physicist.  Mr. Woolworth received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute in 1991, specializing in architectural and musical acoustics and vibrations, spending five years funding his own research on electric and double basses. His studies also include Classical Music Performance at Hartt School of Music and Acoustic Engineering at University of Hartford, as well as jazz with Gerry Carboy of David Sancious’ band Tone, and shared ownership and operation of a sound reinforcement company. While earning his M.A. in Physics at the University of Mississippi in 2000 concentrating in acoustics, he toured half-time as a professional musician. This period included a wide variety of research topics at the National Center for Physical Acoustics, as well as membership in the original house bluegrass band for Mississippi Public Radio's weekly “Thacker Mountain Radio” show. David founded Oxford Acoustics in 2003 to provide consulting, education, and research in acoustics. He has presented over 20 papers internationally on his acoustics research and consults to architects and industry. One of his most recent projects is the Jazz and Heritage Center on Rampart Street which is beginning construction this spring. David still regularly performs with a variety of musical groups, and played the Ogden Museum this past summer with the Blackbird Hour.  David is a member of the National Council of Acoustical Consultants, the Institute of Noise Control Engineering, and the Acoustical Society of America/Technical Committees on Architectural Acoustics and Noise, and teaches architectural acoustics and noise control at Louisiana State University and Mississippi State University schools of architecture.

 

Previous Editions:

Videos:

Click the links below to play videos.

Richard Campanella
Richard Campanella
Bourbon Street 1940s-2000s
Jim Butler
Jim Butler
Music and noise regulations in Austin, TX
Maurice Cox
Maurice Cox
Music and life quality in Charlottesville, VA
David Dixon
David Dixon
Planning for Neighborhoods of Culture
Dave Woolworth
Dave Woolworth
New Orleans Sound Ordinance Study
Joseph S. Lewis
Joseph S. Lewis
Kristin Gisleson Palmer
Kristin Gisleson Palmer
Opening remarks on "culture & regulation"
Scott Aiges
Scott Aiges
Introductory remarks at "Culture & Regulation" symposium

Sponsors:

Support the Foundation
The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Foundation, Inc.